Nature: A Public Health Imperative

As Atlanta’s population grows and the urban environment is developed, our access to nature and greenspace is at risk. What would we lose if we lost our connection to nature? What would that mean for our health and quality of life? And what role do urban parks play in maintaining that connection?

Public Schools as Public Land

Imagine you’re a kid living in an apartment building in an area of town without access to a park. Where can you go outside to play that’s safe? “If the answer is ‘nowhere,’” says Park Pride’s Executive Director, Michael Halicki, “chances are you’ll just stay inside and play video games. We must do better for these kids, and thinking creatively about our public land is the answer.”

Tips for a Stronger, Healthier Community

Parks can catalyze improvements in health and strengthen communities. When the Rev. James Orange Park received Park Pride’s Legacy Grant in 2012, it spurred additional city investment that resulted in a new pool, splash pad, and playground. The residents coalesced around a shared vision of safety, family-friendly amenities, and preservation of nature that resulted in both improved health outcomes and a stronger community.

Spring for Early Pollinators

Signs of spring are around us! Mayapples and bloodroot are pushing up out of the soil with leaves wrapped around should there be a chill. Dogwoods are unfurling creamy white bracts and redbuds are parading fuschia flowers on each still-bare branch. What welcome sights! As temperatures consistently warm, we’ll see more and more flowers and … Continue Reading →

Land Conservation Measure Unanimously Passes Key Committee

Download Printable PDF February 22, 2018 – The Georgia Outdoor Stewardship Act, which would dedicate annual funding to land conservation projects across the state, was passed unanimously this morning by the House Natural Resources Committee. The measure in its current form would generate approximately $20 million annually without raising or creating any new taxes. “This … Continue Reading →

The “Pollinators in Parks” Initiative Creates a BUZZ at STEM Event

In early October, Park Pride and the Atlanta Botanical Garden, in collaboration with West Atlanta Watershed Alliance, Grove Park community gardeners and the Atlanta Public School System, engaged 107 third-grade students from Woodson Park Academy in a fun-filled STEM  (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education event at the Grove Park Pollinator Garden. STEM lessons offer students learning experiences that closely reflect the real-world scenarios and professions that require skills crossing disciplines.

Parks: The Key to Atlantans’ Happiness

Parks are for everyone! It may sound like an obvious statement, but too often beautiful parks are seen as a perk of living in an affluent neighborhood.

Park Pride believes that all people, regardless of economic status, deserve to have access to the well-documented health and wellness benefits associated with living near a park or greenspace. What’s more, we know that great parks—parks that are active and loved by neighbors—make people happy and communities strong.

Observe Signs of the Season in Atlanta’s Parks

Fall is a time generally associated with winding down. However, if you’ve been to any of the five fledgling pollinator gardens in Atlanta’s parks*, you might have noticed a surprising amount of gearing up. Pollinators and other animals know that fall is no time to lounge around. Winter is coming! Pantries must be stocked and bodies fortified—for a long journey southward for those that migrate, or for wintering in place for our resident species.

Plaid Palooza: Raising the Bar for Parks

The countdown is on! It’s hard to believe that we are only four and a half weeks away from the very first Plaid Palooza! I am thrilled to participate in Park Pride’s event on November 4th because it’s a unique opportunity that incorporates: fundraising for a cause I believe in, service to my city, and … Continue Reading →

Ormond-Grant Park Matters

Ormond-Grant Park, just south of Memorial Drive on Atlanta’s East side, was once a very different and scary place. But donors and park enthusiasts, like you, helped change that. Neighbors remember the park as a bleak corner of the neighborhood. Every time it rained, the park flooded, creating an impassible muddy swamp bordering the playground. … Continue Reading →